Research and biotech: Asking right questions

The Ken is a wonderful resource for myriad issues.The staff at The Ken is constantly churning out some of the highest quality journalistic write ups in India. Their focus is mostly on start ups, biotech and increasingly now on security of digital assets. The reason why I recommend it is to broad-base your reading sources and think laterally beyond our narrow confines. Financial crunching may not be everyone’s cup of tea but it has spurred me on to understand more about it’s complexity. In the end, it is a deep dive learning experience to write effectively. In the sea of otherwise hopeless mediocrity that Indian journalism has seeped itself, The Ken (and to some extent, Business Standard) redeem themselves.

Today’s post was motivated by an excellent coverage of biotech sector and this prodded me on to think about what the research goals ought to be. Biotech companies are chasing the end of the rainbow for the pot of gold. The reason why US remains the “gold standard” for these companies is because of a perverse incentive that pharmaceutical companies and hospital corporations have to milk the consumer. That’s where the big money is. And these companies are pushing themselves to crack the market in order to get the first mover advantage.

I will not name a few companies that I have worked with (due to non-disclosure agreements with them and that included not calling them names publicly). There were some great individuals, that I had the good fortune to learn from, as well. This aside, they are mostly floundering pushing their luck. In proverbial terms, trying to see what sticks to the wall.

In one presentation, they presented a “case scenario” which showed how the medical oncologist based his decision on genomic details for lung cancer. In another, they were keen to show for cool-rectal cancer. All laudable but with one significant omission. They did not have any follow up for outcomes! Not only this, none for any clinical trial, suitability for a vast majority or how the specific gene sets were chosen to be marketed.

Its stupidity compounded by idiocy. Over and over again.

Sadly, the translational science hasn’t made specific progress and now we have the buzz words like “precision medicine”. Pray, what is precision medicine?

Hype fuels another set of hype cycles. It is a good thing that all of this looks great on dossiers or fanning our collective egos in fancy conferences but they remain a collective effort for intellectual masturbation. We need hard core data sets and equally hard nosed questions before we thrust all of this in front of hapless patients.

The company mentioned in The Ken write up hasn’t specifically mentioned as to how they will find out the difference in the genetic mutations (from primary index lesion) to the current state. I had earlier explored this concept in an editorial arguing for liquid core biopsies as means to monitor the course of treatment in lung cancers because of the range of molecular mutations.

Rest assured, I have a healthy disdain for pharma company sponsored trials with results that appear too good to be true. When it is translated into actual clinical practise, it doesn’t live up to it’s hype. Remember the Cetuximab “landmark trial”? Or even for that matter, Bevacizumab?

Lets pause. Think.

There ought to be healthy skepticism. A side note to fellow radoncs- there is a lot that can be achieved in Radiation Therapy. We need to explore different fractionation schedules or even radiation sensitisers. Combination therapies do-not always work out. That is the subject for another blog post.

Inbox Zero: Fastmail for academics.

Who wants this?

It is simple.

Sign up for Fastmail.

Have a custom domain, if you want. Or else, existing domains offered by Fastmail work fine.

Have an alias for each website. For example, if you order pizzas, have one for that. For a travel website, have another. The trick is NOT to give out your actual email id but give the alias for that particular site.

This is how it plays out. Go to dominos and have an alias like dominos@fastmail.com (or whatever domain you want). It will immediately segregate your email. If you are spammed for that domain, it is a matter of deleting that alias. Simple. Quick. Painless.

I have folders for all incoming mail, and Fastmail allows setting up rules to sort them out automatically. For example, if I have a newsletter subscription, it is set to flow in that folder and marked as read. Or anything else that I wish to read later.

Achieve that today!