Goals of research

There has been an outpouring of dollars in basic molecular research. Many clinicians have joined in with their labs to push for “clinically relevant research”. It is evident that there would be a lot of duplication and overlap between it.

For example, look at IDH gene in the pathogenesis of gliomas. We know it carries a prognostic significance. We also know about the molecular pathogenesis. How does duplicating the research across different labs helps us or makes us any wiser?

The answer lies in the pharmaceutical business goldmine. Loath to spend on basic research in molecular pathways, the research, instead has been farmed out to a network of labs. It is easy for anyone to form a company and then sell out by being acquired. It is excellent for research ecosystem as it brings about new innovative ideas, but there are some serious issues here.

Public funded research gets outpriced for the end users who have contributed in no small measure to the same. They need to become more aware of these repercussions. Shrinking federal grants for public funded research means that there is no adequate oversight and auditing of the labs that are doing the same thing. These are potentially very high stakes, and patent awards can make individuals pretty rich.

I agree that these are generalisations and that this opinion isn’t set in stone. I have based the above assertion on my reading of the situation as well as verbal accounts.

What is urgently required is a partnership at all levels. It is to focus on one idea that has the potential to work in brain tumours. Pool in resources, under legal agreements, to work on the different aspects of the same problem. The idea above is more akin to a hub-and-spoke model of research. The goal is the identify molecular pathway and understand its implications for radiation therapy.

Let’s say, hypothetically, IDH gliomagenesis is the new pathway discovered. One team to work at a molecular level to identify potential inhibitory points, other to identify molecules that bring about this change. Another side to study the effect of radiation therapy and the pathway. Aggregated results would avoid duplication and overlap and lead to faster translational outcomes.

The problem is that they end up leaving radiation as an after-thought. It should change.

How to use Telegram chat app for academics

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This post is prompted by a discussion I had with a few people on Twitter recently.

Instant messaging applications abound; the most popular amongst them is WhatsApp. It relies on phone numbers to get the work done. By being dead simple, WhatsApp became the most popular application for majority of the users. I believe that it is only a SMS replacement and nothing else. Furthermore, other reason I don’t use it is because its now completely owned by Facebook. The wealth of data related to our social interactions is more important for the company (and thats the reason why its free). Nevertheless, I’ll come straight to the point. How I found Telegram to be better than any chat application and how I use it effectively.

  1. The most important aspect: Bots. They are small nifty software programs that run on the application and automate things. For example, in a group, a Group Butler bot will assist the administrator in welcoming users, make them aware about the rules, limit the media (from pre-arranged rules) and prevent users from flooding. There is a classical music bot that works like Spotify 🙂 The possibilities with bots are endless. Payment bots are maturing on the platform as well.
    bots
  2. Notifications: This is the biggest bane of chat applications and serves to distract us most of the time. As a result, we are hooked to the devices. In Telegram, I have muted all users/groups/channels. The group notifies me only when someone mentions me by my screen name (like Twitter). This indeed is a life saver!
  3. Instant view for articles. It loads up the article (for example from New York Times) inside the app itself. This ensures that I don’t have to jump to the browser.
    instant-view-telegram-updated
  4. Channels serve as a mechanism for one way flow of information. Channel owners can post in media (file limits of 1.5 GB are pretty generous); videos, files, pictures etc but the subscribers cannot comment on it. This avoids the hassles with comment moderation. Channels can have unlimited number of subscribers while groups can accommodate upto 50,000 users (easily managed by bots!) Channels with companion groups can serve as a decent platform for two way communication between users. I manage couple of channels (which are automated) and serve as an admin for several groups without breaking into a sweat.
    Telegram-Channels-List
  5. Last but the not the least. It is a cloud based platform which ensures complete cross platform availability. I can start the conversation on my desktop and continue the same on my mobile device. It can also be accessed via browser. A personal cloud storage comes with it that can store my files indefinitely. Numerous granular privacy controls ensure that I can restrict users from adding me to groups or controlling who can initiate voice calls with me.
    telegram-two-step-verification

Publishers should explore Telegram channels; they can have dedicated systems for payments for premium content (which is invite only link); instant view from the app can ensure filtered information. This app can serve as a distribution hub for media. Bots can be used to link Telegram channel with Twitter, for example. The possibilities, actually are endless! Better still, you get to control access to your busy schedules (Personal chats, except family, groups and channels are all muted).

I really hope academicians and fellow professionals explore this application in right earnestness!