Research in radiation oncology: Break the logjam

I came across this on Twitter (where else!) Despite the “weirdness” (pun intended), it was apparent that it raised substantial issues. I had responded to it, but it merited a blog post.

There has been an institutional push to observe and record in western countries. Higher disposable incomes with specific segments of society helped them to get a better education and as a result, better opportunities. It is not getting into a nuanced debate about the racial differences or affirmative action. Inequalities have always played a part but so is the ability to capitalise on opportunities that present itself.

A lot of research happens because of institutionalised mechanisms. The children have exposure to ideas from the school and paid internships, scholarships and grant opportunities. In India, the approach is entirely insular and works in silos. Medical science has grown incredibly complicated, and it is beyond the purview of anyone to grasp nuances of differentials.

As a result of those initiatives, a few developed economies have led and broken ground in “research” (whether it is transformational or applicable to real-world solutions is immaterial). It has spurred on the likes of China (an aspirational economy) to ape the same system led by the US, but rigid hierarchies stymie them. It is indeed laughable when Government of India decides to set up a “scientific officer for innovation” because it cannot happen in silos. Throwing money at central “research institutes” isn’t going to help because lack of real-world application has hardly moved the needle in any meaningful direction. Likewise, the research is mostly divorced from socio-cultural contexts.

We can only break the log-jam if we first identify the cause of the problem. Outsourced research to understand molecular pathways and then to apply developmental molecules for “blocking them” only perpetuates, what I call a scientific fraud of “monumental proportions” because of perverse incentives associated with “pharmaceuticals”.

(Radiation Therapy needs love- not in delivery methods but radiobiology and fractionation). It is sad that radiation oncologists have more faith and belief in “combination regimes”- altered fractionation schemes have been beneficial too. But progress is excruciatingly slow here.

It would be difficult to think beyond patent protections and intellectual property if someone else controls the purse strings.

Social media: Caveat emptor!

The debate about doctors being on social media hasn’t ended. Most people, I have spoken to, have very negative connotations about it. They feel, very strongly feel, that Twitter is nothing but an echo chamber of bigotry, lies and cussedness. It “might” be true but then technology is what you make it out to be!

Facebook is another different beast. Their claimed usage is about 2 billion users, but no has independently verified these numbers. They have been able to grow this because of powerful network effects. Most users feel comfortable here because it allows them to interact with “friends and family”. It also means that most users are reckless about it.

Facebook is a global surveillance system that gives dopamine fuelled high to be voyeuristic or exhibitionist. Their terms of service point towards collecting the data and being able to share it with “third party affiliates”. I often chuckle when people get horrified that the service they depend on its utility, for administrators, for psychological manipulation. What would it take to learn the lessons?

Social media is as good as we make it out to be. The best ideas for the blog post appear in my Twitter timeline. I get ideas, dwell on them and then write. One way out could be to learn from different specialities, see how they are using it and adapt it yours. The ideas take their shape and pretty soon, a rich interactive web form that enriches it even further.

(I prefer Telegram app).

Financial Disclosure: Much more than meets the eye

I have always wondered what the disclosures mean. Financial disclosure, to my understanding, means that no sums of money are involved in the publishing of the manuscript.

If a funding organisation has offered grants to a researcher that leads to publication, is the researcher acting as an “agent” of that organisation by researching what the agency wants?

There’s always an agenda.

Conflicts of interest sound more fanciful. It is a philosophical argument that seems like more of an afterthought and a subtle print as a footnote. I believe that most readers have turned a blind eye to this relative obscurity. I am also surprised that people in conferences often highlight this, but I digress. It is a matter of personal preference.

I think that the time has now come to be more comprehensive about the research agendas as well as identify motivation behind publications. This post was triggered by an innocuous write up in one “prestigious journal” where the lead author had pushed for a particular technological breakthrough in the healthcare system (Disclosure: I don’t want to highlight it for fear of reprisals!). One of the names that caught my eye was a company I had previously aliased. I was keen to bring in the same technology in India and report it’s suitability for Indian conditions. The executives decided not to implement it (and that’s another story!)

But how many people aware that the company in disclosure has precisely the same division working to popularise the health care intervention listed in the article? I have my genuine doubts because it is very niche.

Hint: Most users are unaware of who manufactures the innards of mobile devices.

I think it is time to explain these disclosures comprehensively in the context of the article.

Glioma research: Asking right questions

There is an arms race to find the next molecular target. The potential spin-offs are enormous. Royalty payments. Insurance payouts.

Despite insane profits, big pharma has lost its drive to push forward for drug discovery. The easy way is to buy out the biotechnology companies (startups) or chase the clinical conditions which have healthy fat margins (like hypertension). Rare diseases like brain tumours haven’t seen any incremental investments over the past few years because of poor outcomes. Tumour treating field is the only “breakthrough” in recent times for recurrent tumours.

Therefore, the onus lies on informal networks of universities and individual researchers for pushing this narrative forward. Despite the wasted research dollars, there is a lot of promise for translational research.

My proposal has the following (very broad/generic) outline here.

The problem, at the outset, is the cost of sequencing. But it is a necessary evil. Unless we know what type of a tumour we are dealing with or its genetic signature, we cannot hope for proper characterisation. This information needs to be mated to clinical follow up with standard protocols.

Is there any scope for in-vivo monitoring? If yes, what is going to be its timeline? How frequently are we going to see for the mutations? What is the rate of mutations? What is its timescale? When should we intervene?

Another favourite pet theory is the class distinction for stem cells. Do they exist? If yes, why can’t they be reliably identified? What are their niches and what is the best way to target them?

Each sequencing would reveal a wealth of clinical data (both genomics as well as radio-genomics) and spur on more deep dive into the molecular ontology. Yes, that might fulfil the wet dream for molecular targets as well. However, as a radiation oncologist, I am only keen to know whether I can reduce my tumour volumes, how we can reduce the dose to normal structures (brain) and combine efforts with patient-related outcomes.

Bring it on! Let us do it! (Have some laughs!!)

Research and biotech: Asking right questions

The Ken is a wonderful resource for myriad issues.The staff at The Ken is constantly churning out some of the highest quality journalistic write ups in India. Their focus is mostly on start ups, biotech and increasingly now on security of digital assets. The reason why I recommend it is to broad-base your reading sources and think laterally beyond our narrow confines. Financial crunching may not be everyone’s cup of tea but it has spurred me on to understand more about it’s complexity. In the end, it is a deep dive learning experience to write effectively. In the sea of otherwise hopeless mediocrity that Indian journalism has seeped itself, The Ken (and to some extent, Business Standard) redeem themselves.

Today’s post was motivated by an excellent coverage of biotech sector and this prodded me on to think about what the research goals ought to be. Biotech companies are chasing the end of the rainbow for the pot of gold. The reason why US remains the “gold standard” for these companies is because of a perverse incentive that pharmaceutical companies and hospital corporations have to milk the consumer. That’s where the big money is. And these companies are pushing themselves to crack the market in order to get the first mover advantage.

I will not name a few companies that I have worked with (due to non-disclosure agreements with them and that included not calling them names publicly). There were some great individuals, that I had the good fortune to learn from, as well. This aside, they are mostly floundering pushing their luck. In proverbial terms, trying to see what sticks to the wall.

In one presentation, they presented a “case scenario” which showed how the medical oncologist based his decision on genomic details for lung cancer. In another, they were keen to show for cool-rectal cancer. All laudable but with one significant omission. They did not have any follow up for outcomes! Not only this, none for any clinical trial, suitability for a vast majority or how the specific gene sets were chosen to be marketed.

Its stupidity compounded by idiocy. Over and over again.

Sadly, the translational science hasn’t made specific progress and now we have the buzz words like “precision medicine”. Pray, what is precision medicine?

Hype fuels another set of hype cycles. It is a good thing that all of this looks great on dossiers or fanning our collective egos in fancy conferences but they remain a collective effort for intellectual masturbation. We need hard core data sets and equally hard nosed questions before we thrust all of this in front of hapless patients.

The company mentioned in The Ken write up hasn’t specifically mentioned as to how they will find out the difference in the genetic mutations (from primary index lesion) to the current state. I had earlier explored this concept in an editorial arguing for liquid core biopsies as means to monitor the course of treatment in lung cancers because of the range of molecular mutations.

Rest assured, I have a healthy disdain for pharma company sponsored trials with results that appear too good to be true. When it is translated into actual clinical practise, it doesn’t live up to it’s hype. Remember the Cetuximab “landmark trial”? Or even for that matter, Bevacizumab?

Lets pause. Think.

There ought to be healthy skepticism. A side note to fellow radoncs- there is a lot that can be achieved in Radiation Therapy. We need to explore different fractionation schedules or even radiation sensitisers. Combination therapies do-not always work out. That is the subject for another blog post.

Inbox Zero: Fastmail for academics.

Who wants this?

It is simple.

Sign up for Fastmail.

Have a custom domain, if you want. Or else, existing domains offered by Fastmail work fine.

Have an alias for each website. For example, if you order pizzas, have one for that. For a travel website, have another. The trick is NOT to give out your actual email id but give the alias for that particular site.

This is how it plays out. Go to dominos and have an alias like dominos@fastmail.com (or whatever domain you want). It will immediately segregate your email. If you are spammed for that domain, it is a matter of deleting that alias. Simple. Quick. Painless.

I have folders for all incoming mail, and Fastmail allows setting up rules to sort them out automatically. For example, if I have a newsletter subscription, it is set to flow in that folder and marked as read. Or anything else that I wish to read later.

Achieve that today!