Achieving the digital detox.

Over the past few months, during my interaction with various people on Twitter and offline, I have been hearing about the information deluge that makes it impossible for them to acquire new skills. We indeed have limited 24 hours!

I wouldn’t be able to give a blow by blow account of how I manage things, but I have had to stick to certain good habits that have made things more comfortable for me. I will mention a few services below that make it incredibly easy to flow past the flood of distractions.

1) Mobile phone:

This is the biggest annoyance! I am off the social networks on the device barring Telegram. More on that later.

Twitter is accessed only on the browser. No dedicated applications exist. All notifications on the device are blocked except for text messages.

Telegram helps me to mute all conversations except people whom I deem essential. I have a lot of channels where I consume content passively. No mainstream social networks like Facebook or Instagram for me. They are antiquated because I cannot control them.

I also don’t have a fear of missing out. My associates either call me or text me if needed. Android has become better to manage notifications in recent times. I don’t have any experience with iOS, but I remain convinced that Apple iPhones are merely iPods with a calling facility.

2) Email.

I had mentioned this earlier too. I use Fastmail because I find there is inherent value in paying up for the email. I use a lot of aliases whenever I sign up for the service. It helps to signup with a unique email address. For example, for Dropbox, my alias will be dropbox (at) FastMail dot com (it is a hypothetical- just for illustration). Therefore, if any spam flows into my inbox, I know where is the leak from. All I have to do is to delete the alias.

This simple hack has served me well over six years, and I am happy to stay with this service. Mainstream email applications like Gmail or Yahoo are useless.

I have also created extensive rules which directs the email in the trash. It helps to clean up the clutter at the server itself without manual intervention. For example, all newsletters go to trash directly. Some of them are automatically marked as read and stay in the inbox- I scan through them when I get time. When they are marked as read, I don’t get a notification. Therefore, can easily stay focused on my work without being distracted by the flow in the inbox.

3) Password Manager

1Password is the password manager that is my life saver. It generates unique passwords for all the websites. It is a paid service, but good cloud sync helps me to sync it with my Android device as well. It eliminates the need to remember unique passwords.

4) The use of Telegram chat app

Telegram remains the only way to stay connected with any semblance of “social network”. I use a combination of groups and channels to stay informed. Channels work as public broadcasts. Any specific information I need is transmitted to it. I use bots (both paid and free) to achieve the effect.

For example, I use the IFTTT bot to work with the RSS feeds to populate the channels with the Pubmed content. If I need to track, say the latest publications in the development of MR-LINAC, I don’t have to visit the website manually. By use of booleans, I can filter the content, generate the specific RSS feeds which pipes it elegantly in the channel via IFTTT bot. Likewise, I use junction-connection bot and Feed-Reader bot for different purposes. I pool in information from all specific channels I need to follow into one omnibus channel so that I don’t have to deal with a multitude of channels. I do this by using junction-bot on Telegram.

Feed-Reader bot helps me to tap into various other social networks. For example, I have a specific channel devoted to cycling. All posts from multiple Instagram accounts flow in the channel. It helps me to keep track of the sectoral development. Likewise, I developed a channel for journalists on Telegram to keep track of telecom sector and clean energy. I also have a dedicated art channel that I helped to make for a friend. That collects all impressionist art, beautiful nature pictures and graffiti! None of the posts is done manually.

Focused groups require extensive group management. I recommend using Combot because it comes with a beautiful web-interface. Although the community bot management has introduced a paid plan, it is free for groups that have up to 100 members. The bot deletes specific stop words automatically along with other nifty features like muting users. The bot also keeps groups free of spam messages. Therefore, the groups stay efficient, productive and on course. It is unlike WhatsApp where users start spamming others without any rhyme or reason.

This above may sound onerous, but it helps to maximise the efficiency gains. As long as you are not distracted, it helps to keep focused on work.

In the busy schedules that we keep, always find time for solitude. That is the most critical period to stop and reflect on your goals.

Digital tools need a constant refinement. Hopefully, I will update this in the future.

(Images are for representational purpose only. This blog post is not intended for any commercial purpose).

Wiki for brain tumour charities

Early this week, I had announced that I would develop a Wiki page for collecting the links to all brain tumour charities. However, this is a herculean task indeed.

If I were to use the existing resources at Wikipedia, editing the webpage is an onerous task. They haven’t migrated to a simple modular structure like in a blogging template nor do they allow any specific linkages with applications on the desktop. The only way out is to use a browser. Their interface would scare the most battle-hardened veteran as well.

What is the way out? Telegram again comes to my rescue. The way out is straightforward.

1) I have created a submission bot (braintumourbot) that will interface directly with a private group.

2) A standard format for submission can be evolved.

3) I will be using specific hashtags. For example #US for North America, #UK for Britain, #AUS for Australia and the likes. Any user keen to look for information under the head will be able to locate it by just clicking on the hashtag.

4) #LON under London will display the charities based there. If they a website address and a Twitter/Social account, it will be listed accordingly. This consistent storage of information will help me to organise the information quickly.

Telegram does offer the speed and reliability with added security for the users. I think this is the best way forward to crowdsource the information.

I have ideas for a dedicated mobile application as well, but that would require yet another mobile app; resources can be utilised to make things efficient. I remain sceptical about either a website or the apps.

Let’s see how this experiment grows!

Can you rely on Twitter?

Of late, my engagement with Twitter has decreased as my cynicism about social media has resurfaced. I have always held the belief that Twitter is, at first, a link-sharing service. The 140 characters and URL shortening services came out of that. However, they have actively tried to increase engagement.

It doesn’t happen like that. The rates of engagement (defined by clicking on the shared links) are abysmal. It means that anyone given the user is at the mercy of algorithms. Any change in that and the discoverability falls to zero.

The Twitter timeline is unsuitable for orderly consumption. I had mentioned before, and I reiterate- it depends on how algorithm ranks your association and engagement with other users. I have tried, with varying levels of success, to participate in the “live-tweeting”, but the heterogeneous nature of discussion doesn’t add structure.

I have bet my horses on Telegram instead. It is growing, without any direct marketing. The groups remain functional by use of bots which automate policing the channel. It ensures that no one misuses the allotted privileges to speak up. I have been managing a group recently which makes it easier for disparate users to discuss issues cohesively and understandably. Sharing links, inline players and in-app browser (or instant view) is a huge plus.

If the bottom line is efficiency, then yes, Telegram wins hands down. Twitter is becoming a mass of super-added mess. I use the offline Tweet clients because the web-version has a subpar experience. Besides, it tracks using cookies and other means.

I have tried (valiantly!) to convince users to switch gears. Staying online makes it worse for identity thefts. People implicitly trust social networks, but it is a decision that is fraught with danger.

Twitter is in search of a business model that would pay up for itself. As an ad-supported service, the users are the product. Despite the real-time insights, Twitter has been dumb enough not to be able to capitalise on the generated data. Either way, despite the promises of being able to provide a medium of discovery, the real fun happens in closed groups where we chat up, in detail, about issues that are close to heart.

The new promised updates to Twitter will still languish and leave you at the mercy of nameless, faceless algorithm. Think about it.

There’s still time to change gears.

Twitter: Towards a slow spiral of death

Twitter is getting desperate after an increased focus and scrutiny of its actual number of users. While they use metrics like users who were online in the past month, Twitter knows that it is a sinking ship.

There was a lot of hoopla about Twitter making its first profit after consecutive losses. However, it seemed like a flash in the pan. It is yanking off the API’s (third party services which connect via desktop applications). It wants web-only services so that it can serve up “personalised” advertisements. The daily engagement with the service is declining.

It is a worrying trend. While the BTSM practitioners have linked and bonded over this microblogging service, it is easier to get lost in the din of rapid tweets which makes it impossible for any coherent discourse. I have seen posts from institutions- pictures shot from the OT about the cases that they have done. Why this kind of marketing?

The impact of social media ought to be real- like reaching out to potential donors, for example. However, that individual tweet is decidedly less likely to be seen by a specific person. Re-Tweets or Symplur impressions hardly have any bearing on the impact of “tweet”. It only states how many people could have possibly seen. Were they the correct target audience?

A vast majority of the population isn’t aware of nuances of Twitter which can be overwhelming. Mobile interface, like Telegram, needs to be explored in earnest. It should be linked to all the Telegram links (like URL’s). That is also a safe, secure service which doesn’t track you, unlike Twitter.

Why blogging is essential

When you face an empty sheet, the hardest part is to define the direction you want to give to your words.

This post was in response to a brilliant blog post on 33charts, which is peddled by an influential paediatrician. I love the way he wraps up his ideas which is both a joy and a delight to read.

I have flirted and experimented with blogging consistently over the past few years (a decade or more). I am aware of how the blogging landscape evolved.

This neuroblog was set up later in response to many recommendations by those who had been there. Blogging is the best way to be able to get your ideas out. It showcases what is on your mind.

If you are clear in your mind, you can set out to do what you wish to achieve. Hence, this blogging platform is essential to categorise as well as firm up the opinion.

Twitter is sorely limited to express both the nuance as well as context. A blogging platform only explains the background, but spoken word or personal interactions best explain nuance.

Each one of these leads to a more vibrant diversity of opinion.

(Images are subject to copyright of their owners)

Twitter for oncologists: Beyond 280 characters

I had my disdain for social media. It had been in the news for all wrong reasons. This post isn’t going to add to a growing and mounting evidence that social media is practically useless for politics because it amplifies our echo chambers and fuelling our confirmation biases. In the past few months, I have learned enough to hand hold a few tech-phobic colleagues and discover the positive side instead.

The hashtag: Twitter revolves around hash-tags. This is akin to a large room where people are discussing a topic; they come, and they leave the room. By having an open door policy, anyone can join in the conversation. It is like a large town-hall. Twitter usually lists trending hash-tags, but there are numerous third-party services which reveal global hashtags; not large enough to trend but essential nevertheless.

For example, #btsm is the hashtag for brain tumours social media. Often, patient advocates invite many thought leaders to debate and discuss on brain tumours. Anyone can use the hashtag to follow the process.

You guessed it right. The signal to noise ratio is very low, which makes it difficult to follow the conversation, meaningfully.

Username by @: They enduring symbol “@“ when prepended in front of a username, alerts the person (via notification) that he/she has been called out in the noisy room. You can either use the hashtag in the conversation (when the chats are being conducted) or individually if you wish to draw someone’s attention to their Twitter stream.

Twitter stream: Algorithms usually determine the endless “tweets” you see. Therefore, when you start out, with an empty slate, the number of tweets tend to be overwhelming as you start following various users. It happens because, Twitter, as a service, uses, the number of signals (your community engagement or number of re-tweets etc.) to determine what you are going to see there. The idea is to stay focused on what your goals are.

Direct Message: This works like an inbox system; you can restrict the users who can reach out to you.

It can quickly get overwhelming on this service. You will have to make several modifications to the way you are notified- via email, desktop or mobile clients. I prefer to get a notification only on a direct message from people who follow me. For everything else, it is switched off.

I prefer and recommend a desktop application (TweetBot for Mac). But you are forewarned. The developers do not bother to reply to your queries, and it lacks several customisation features. It gets the job done because I can filter out the advertisements on the web service. I also prefer to have a Tweetmarker service to go through the unread tweets. You can also turn off retweets from specific followers or mute them indefinitely.

Should you use Twitter or Facebook? In my opinion, both are bad. Even though the masses are there, but it represents too much of concentration of “power” in the hands of an algorithm. That’s why I prefer, the simple and straightforward Telegram. Groups work precisely that ways- you can quickly set up hashtags to organise the chats. Not many people follow this. Channels work exactly like a public broadcast. You can always set up links to discuss issues in the groups. As usual, there is a going to be a vast majority of people who will not speak up.

Closing thoughts: Twitter represents a dominant social media with numerous warts. I call it robust, only because of the sheer number of users, who have flocked to this medium. Most users are technology agnostic. People usually go by word of mouth recommendation or something which they have heard is “popular”.

It is time to take the leap of faith and contribute to the positive side of social media. As well as, try out something different and better! (Hint: Telegram)

The launch of Telegram channel (CNSSM- Central Nervous System, Social Media).

Over the past few months, I have been exploring Telegram chat application over the choice of other options that have flooded the cyberspace. Telegram embodies the best prospects of all in one neat package. It’s apparent that its closest competitor WhatsApp is the most commonly used app on the planet, but it comes with several limitations. The chief amongst them is constant surveillance by Facebook which makes it impossible to be “private” even though; it may have end to end encryption. I won’t go into details here but suffice to say that Telegram offers a much better option to interact.

One of its redeeming features is channel and hashtag search. Channels are uni-directional flows for information. It means that users can read it but not reply to it. Subscribers can be directed to chat groups to discuss any pertinent issue. Since the channels have unlimited members, Telegram offers a perfect scalable option for that. The exciting bit is hashtag function which, for me, was quite serendipitous. The posts come tagged automatically like #events #charity (pushed by different brain tumour charities), #updates and my favourite #motivation (posters with quotes). I can also add reminders for various websites/ events over a recurring interval.

A Telegram group works like any other chat application but with distinct advantages. It can have multiple administrators (to moderate discussions over different time zones), users can also add hashtags to search (or do a global search for anything discussed), access to all previous messages for new members, mute notifications and notification alert only if their username is tagged in replies. I prefer anonymity and privacy in social networks. Twitter may serve as an excellent platform but is not altruistic- it logs and tracks every user. Further, it has a severe limitation of characters which does not address individual queries effectively.

The idea behind is to consolidate everything in one application. The telegram app is accessible via desktops and multiple platforms (including a web browser) which doesn’t constrain users from one locked in place. Phone numbers aren’t required to join a group or channel. They just need to do a global search via public username; here in this case “cnssm” (without quotes).

Another distinct advantage is an amplification of social media messages. We are drowned in by mobile notifications and Telegram offers granular control over what gets your attention. Much of what I do on Telegram is automated which makes things easier to manage.

I hope that most charities would consider this platform- its fast, quick, private, secure, scalable; indeed, everything that’s required to keep privacy intact. Once the channel grows, I plan to introduce video messages; a quick blurb on what patients need to do and focus on; have a separate group for professionals to share best practises and files. Ideally, we could have a rehabilitation specialist, a dietician and social workers. Charities should also keep a token presence here to identify users and guide them efficiently for financial issues.