Can you rely on Twitter?

Of late, my engagement with Twitter has decreased as my cynicism about social media has resurfaced. I have always held the belief that Twitter is, at first, a link-sharing service. The 140 characters and URL shortening services came out of that. However, they have actively tried to increase engagement.

It doesn’t happen like that. The rates of engagement (defined by clicking on the shared links) are abysmal. It means that anyone given the user is at the mercy of algorithms. Any change in that and the discoverability falls to zero.

The Twitter timeline is unsuitable for orderly consumption. I had mentioned before, and I reiterate- it depends on how algorithm ranks your association and engagement with other users. I have tried, with varying levels of success, to participate in the “live-tweeting”, but the heterogeneous nature of discussion doesn’t add structure.

I have bet my horses on Telegram instead. It is growing, without any direct marketing. The groups remain functional by use of bots which automate policing the channel. It ensures that no one misuses the allotted privileges to speak up. I have been managing a group recently which makes it easier for disparate users to discuss issues cohesively and understandably. Sharing links, inline players and in-app browser (or instant view) is a huge plus.

If the bottom line is efficiency, then yes, Telegram wins hands down. Twitter is becoming a mass of super-added mess. I use the offline Tweet clients because the web-version has a subpar experience. Besides, it tracks using cookies and other means.

I have tried (valiantly!) to convince users to switch gears. Staying online makes it worse for identity thefts. People implicitly trust social networks, but it is a decision that is fraught with danger.

Twitter is in search of a business model that would pay up for itself. As an ad-supported service, the users are the product. Despite the real-time insights, Twitter has been dumb enough not to be able to capitalise on the generated data. Either way, despite the promises of being able to provide a medium of discovery, the real fun happens in closed groups where we chat up, in detail, about issues that are close to heart.

The new promised updates to Twitter will still languish and leave you at the mercy of nameless, faceless algorithm. Think about it.

There’s still time to change gears.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s