Twitter for oncologists: More reflections.

One thing is apparent. Twitter as a service, is for sharing links alone. The original premise was to get the overall perspective of how users discuss issues in “real time” and function as a “real-time” search engine. Google, at some point, listed Twitter results but it ended for reasons best known to them.

The more the people on any platform leads to an excessive banter. Separating the signal from the noise becomes even more difficult as informational deluge overwhelms us. While it is fanciful to have more Twitter (or Instagram) followers and show off as “influencers”, it doesn’t help much because of abysmal rates of engagement. While I may consistently get a large number of “Tweet impressions” (mumbo-jumbo of acronyms that Twitter is marketing), this is useless as it doesn’t translate to real life behavioural change.

It is evident from the fact that engagement with my shared links is abysmally poor. My idea of being on the social network is an academic exchange. Suppose I share in a link which is opened and read by another- it would foster a dialogue of information.

On the other extreme, I have come across “verified” accounts of “star-influencers” in Oncology community who push out links with annotations, pictures, survival curves and proper attribution to the authors. How do those “star-influencers” manage it?

I have a strong reason to believe that these links are pushed by dedicated teams using enterprise accounts. A lot of window dressing takes place and after “approval” is “tweeted” out. You have to see the pattern to understand it. It is impossible to juggle professional commitments with tweeting links all the time. There has to be a team involved.

The race for “followers” has polluted the ecosystem. Automated bots propel the specific “likes” making it impossible to differentiate legitimate traffic from bot sponsored and propagated traffic.

I am not cynical. I use Twitter for ideas to write on this blog here. I observe trends. I interact with virtual selves of humans, genteel people scattered all over the planet. It is fun to learn from there, to ping them and understand their perspectives. The trick is to moderate, turning off retweets which don’t concern you, muting specific words and staying focused on what you wish to gain. As a result, I have whittled down to less than half off my previous unread tweets on the timeline. It took time to cull away the deadwood and the fresh perspectives soak in. In the end, it was worth it.

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