Research in radiation oncology: Break the logjam

I came across this on Twitter (where else!) Despite the “weirdness” (pun intended), it was apparent that it raised substantial issues. I had responded to it, but it merited a blog post.

There has been an institutional push to observe and record in western countries. Higher disposable incomes with specific segments of society helped them to get a better education and as a result, better opportunities. It is not getting into a nuanced debate about the racial differences or affirmative action. Inequalities have always played a part but so is the ability to capitalise on opportunities that present itself.

A lot of research happens because of institutionalised mechanisms. The children have exposure to ideas from the school and paid internships, scholarships and grant opportunities. In India, the approach is entirely insular and works in silos. Medical science has grown incredibly complicated, and it is beyond the purview of anyone to grasp nuances of differentials.

As a result of those initiatives, a few developed economies have led and broken ground in “research” (whether it is transformational or applicable to real-world solutions is immaterial). It has spurred on the likes of China (an aspirational economy) to ape the same system led by the US, but rigid hierarchies stymie them. It is indeed laughable when Government of India decides to set up a “scientific officer for innovation” because it cannot happen in silos. Throwing money at central “research institutes” isn’t going to help because lack of real-world application has hardly moved the needle in any meaningful direction. Likewise, the research is mostly divorced from socio-cultural contexts.

We can only break the log-jam if we first identify the cause of the problem. Outsourced research to understand molecular pathways and then to apply developmental molecules for “blocking them” only perpetuates, what I call a scientific fraud of “monumental proportions” because of perverse incentives associated with “pharmaceuticals”.

(Radiation Therapy needs love- not in delivery methods but radiobiology and fractionation). It is sad that radiation oncologists have more faith and belief in “combination regimes”- altered fractionation schemes have been beneficial too. But progress is excruciatingly slow here.

It would be difficult to think beyond patent protections and intellectual property if someone else controls the purse strings.

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