Twitter for oncologists: Beyond 280 characters

I had my disdain for social media. It had been in the news for all wrong reasons. This post isn’t going to add to a growing and mounting evidence that social media is practically useless for politics because it amplifies our echo chambers and fuelling our confirmation biases. In the past few months, I have learned enough to hand hold a few tech-phobic colleagues and discover the positive side instead.

The hashtag: Twitter revolves around hash-tags. This is akin to a large room where people are discussing a topic; they come, and they leave the room. By having an open door policy, anyone can join in the conversation. It is like a large town-hall. Twitter usually lists trending hash-tags, but there are numerous third-party services which reveal global hashtags; not large enough to trend but essential nevertheless.

For example, #btsm is the hashtag for brain tumours social media. Often, patient advocates invite many thought leaders to debate and discuss on brain tumours. Anyone can use the hashtag to follow the process.

You guessed it right. The signal to noise ratio is very low, which makes it difficult to follow the conversation, meaningfully.

Username by @: They enduring symbol “@“ when prepended in front of a username, alerts the person (via notification) that he/she has been called out in the noisy room. You can either use the hashtag in the conversation (when the chats are being conducted) or individually if you wish to draw someone’s attention to their Twitter stream.

Twitter stream: Algorithms usually determine the endless “tweets” you see. Therefore, when you start out, with an empty slate, the number of tweets tend to be overwhelming as you start following various users. It happens because, Twitter, as a service, uses, the number of signals (your community engagement or number of re-tweets etc.) to determine what you are going to see there. The idea is to stay focused on what your goals are.

Direct Message: This works like an inbox system; you can restrict the users who can reach out to you.

It can quickly get overwhelming on this service. You will have to make several modifications to the way you are notified- via email, desktop or mobile clients. I prefer to get a notification only on a direct message from people who follow me. For everything else, it is switched off.

I prefer and recommend a desktop application (TweetBot for Mac). But you are forewarned. The developers do not bother to reply to your queries, and it lacks several customisation features. It gets the job done because I can filter out the advertisements on the web service. I also prefer to have a Tweetmarker service to go through the unread tweets. You can also turn off retweets from specific followers or mute them indefinitely.

Should you use Twitter or Facebook? In my opinion, both are bad. Even though the masses are there, but it represents too much of concentration of “power” in the hands of an algorithm. That’s why I prefer, the simple and straightforward Telegram. Groups work precisely that ways- you can quickly set up hashtags to organise the chats. Not many people follow this. Channels work exactly like a public broadcast. You can always set up links to discuss issues in the groups. As usual, there is a going to be a vast majority of people who will not speak up.

Closing thoughts: Twitter represents a dominant social media with numerous warts. I call it robust, only because of the sheer number of users, who have flocked to this medium. Most users are technology agnostic. People usually go by word of mouth recommendation or something which they have heard is “popular”.

It is time to take the leap of faith and contribute to the positive side of social media. As well as, try out something different and better! (Hint: Telegram)

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