Can we have a Spotify like model for academic publishing?

I have always disliked the idea of paywalls. If I have to borrow the cliche from silicon valley rags, it amounts to having “friction” in accessing the resources. It is a huge pain, especially, if you don’t have the resources.

Much has been written about the advent of scientific publishing in the internet era. And despite the monopolistic tendencies of publishers in erecting huge barriers, likes of Sci-Hub are winning. A few “pirate” websites have extended its support and currently houses the bulk of published scientific literature. Interestingly, the majority of access happens from university campuses where they have already paid for the access! It is a natural human tendency to look for the most comfortable way out!

This post is not about accessing Sci-Hub, but it reminds me of a bitter battle between pirates and Hollywood executives who had similar issues in 90’s with torrents. They are losing profits, as per their claims (despite mansions/big cars/lavish lifestyles) and are locked in pitched battles with telecom service providers to identify those who “pirate”. Paywalls and digital rights management system did not deter those who were determined to access content. Telegram, for example, has emerged as one of the largest piracy hubs for movie distribution on mobile because of its generous file limits.

This post is not to discuss these nuances, but it set me thinking. Why can’t we have a Spotify/Netflix like model for academic papers? At a monthly cost of around 10 USD with all publishers pooling in their resources, it can be a formidable challenge to a tendency to pirate. Technology has made DRM easier. Do we see pirated Netflix original content? Yes, true. But Netflix/Spotify offers a superior UI. The ratio of people paying up versus those who pirate is larger; hence these companies are profitable.

Publishing houses should accept the writing on the wall. I would be all for a Spotify like model for papers. Every stakeholder stands to gain.

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