How Twitter enriched me professionally as a radiation oncologist

I am a recent convert to Twitter but have flirted with it in its earlier days of inception when 140 characters were the norm. It wasn’t apparent as to why this service came into existence in the first place. Facebook started off with a similar pretence of “connecting dorm mates”, and it grew viral pretty fast from an invite-only platform to connect a majority of the online population.

I will not go in its politics or how toxic it has become. Its algorithms are an opaque science, and Facebook is a platform for social and psychological manipulation (despite public claims to the contrary). For this write-up, I’ll focus only on Twitter since I am engaging with it on a daily basis.

Twitter offers a place for discussion, sharing links, some media (pictures) and a medium to reach out to other users for marketing. Advertisers see some value in it (because Twitter offers granular options for targeting users). Beyond that, most scientists and doctors have discovered this as a platform to articulate their viewpoints. There’s life beyond academia as well, and most events affect us collectively. However, it blurs lines between personal and professional lives, often. This has prompted several professional organisations coming in with their “recommendations”, but social media is like any other platform which is public.

There is no inherent privacy if you get online. Period. Likewise, all this serves as a construct to showcase or to interact (like presenting a paper in conference or hanging out with colleagues post lunch). This also leads to a considerable scope for confusion because of the inherent limitation of characters. Like any written word, it cannot offer tone, tenor and contextual meanings which leaves things open to interpretation. However, Twitter provides only a limited scope of interaction via “re-tweet” or “like” which signals the intent. Beyond this engagement, it is a very limited platform.

With these caveats, Twitter offers a rich experience in professional interaction. I chanced on pathology colleagues, for example, who could reach out others in the world for a rapid “second opinion”. Pathological inferences usually require objective criteria, and it is not possible to be swayed by “wisdom of the crowd”. It makes it easier to nail the diagnosis for anything that’s obscure. Likewise, I interacted with a radiation oncologist, who advocated “shining the light in the basement”- exhorting fellow oncologists to embrace this medium. Another instance wherein I interacted with someone from the US to discuss the QA for a newer gamma knife machine. The follow-up comments were interesting, and I learned a lot in the process.

Similarly, it was fun to interact with professionals from down under! They are using social media in a very positive way (by dancing!) to target cancer and bring about an attitudinal change for radiation oncology (unstated and underused, like anywhere else in the world). I love their imaginative use of “targeting cancer” pin-ups with the backdrop of landmarks. Cats and dogs are also a part of it, for good measure! The idea is to get the word out to patients, who shouldn’t ever feel that they are alone. We are all a part of the team to take care of them.

These advocacy efforts on behalf of professionals are in addition to a lot of other patient advocates- one who has gone through the trauma of diagnosis and treatment and have lived to tell their stories.It is instructive for us to learn, as doctors, to understand and be empathic to their fears, concerns and how cancer diagnosis fundamentally changes their lives. A prominent patient advocate, for example, even suggested having “lego based models” to show what patients would be going through (radiation therapy mockups). A brilliant idea indeed!

Scientists have also joined in this chorus and have added their might to it. I follow their efforts to bring science to the public domain, how they navigate through government bureaucracy and how translational science can become the cornerstone of “cure”.

So yes, there are multiple positive attributes to being here on social media! For those who are starting out, a quick re-cap. You can follow specific “hashtags” like #btsm (brain tumour social media) or #radonc which are widely used around. Topical conversation happens around these hashtags. If you suffix the character “@“ before anyone’s username, it is like a “shout-out” to draw their attention. (Similar technique works in Telegram).

Join in here for the conversation and enjoy! Remember, you have only one life to make a difference!

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